I was asked to respond to some of the history of Tedder House in Llandudno for Ideas People Places, working alongside Marc Rees, Lisa Carter and Helfa Gelf. Now standing empty stripped back to the bare bricks, all the that remains of the old R.A.F.A Club are stories and a few artefacts amongst the surviving members. After meeting with several people who were involved with the old club I was able to piece together a few memories and bring some of this once great town instution back to life. The work was projected onto a trophy cabinet from the old club on the opening night, and club members were invited to see it, there will be another opportunity to see the film in September during Helfa Gelf.

Roads030

Roads053

I grew up in an industrial northern town. In the 1980s the industry left…

British industry underwent a period of turbulent change during the 1980s as a result of new government policies.  The Thatcher administration then advanced the concept of ‘The Industrial Estate’, which became an out of town regeneration scheme that every town wanted. As an island, there is only so much small industry our infrastructure can support.

Often when an area receives European funding, it is designated as an inhabitable Brownfield Site renovation scheme. Such official terminology can be perceived as disingenuous and becomes a metaphor for deprivation. I aim to document the junctions and roads of the areas where the jobs never came.

http://watersideartscentre.co.uk/whats-on/1297-risk/ Please go and see my exhibition if you are over at Sale in Manchester


							

Adding Photography to music is something that really interests me. I was approached by Joel Cockrill to work on a project with my images to his music. I think the music changes the feel of work. What do you think? The work is from three bodies of work. The now demolished car park from Get Carter in Gateshead called Trinity Square. It was designed by Owen Lunder. One of the top designers in the Brutalist movement. My Surrealist Seamless links work and the more recent ‘your last breath’



I recently read John Szarokowski’s 1964 book The Photographers Eye. This was produced to cover M.O.M.A first critically acclaimed photography exhibition, in the book he cover the topics which he sees are the 5 basic principles of a photograph. They are

THE THING ITSELF

This is my Cat Millie she runs the house. The look on her face makes me think of Robert De Niro In Taxi Driver http://www.filmsite.org/wavfiles/taxidriver2.wav

THE DETAIL

As you can see from the information the image gives you . She is a cute cat with fine gray fur and eyes that could melt ice burghs. She is always alert never switching off. She can be very placid when she can be bothered with human interaction. The closeness of the image gives the scale human qualities as often used by the likes of William Eggleston

THE FRAME

The framing of the image shows that she is in a house lording it up on a chair. The slightly off centre subject in the image gives you a feel of warmth and content maybe sat in front room

TIME

I had to be quick and get the cat looking straight into the lens of the camera, had she have been looking away it would have lost some power and honesty it was taken at 1/8 f8 iso 100 flash +2 zoom 50mm

VANTAGE POINT

The subject is the key to the image . We are not interested in anything else the image has to offer other than maybe its indoors. Taken from higher vantage point i.e standing; the cat would have looked different. A shot from the side would be distracted by a clock case or the T.v. So on my knees close in at the cats view of things makes us engage with the subject.

These are simple thing you can do every time you take a photo. a simple image can when broken down tell so much. What do you think?

 

http://www.londonphotonow.com/

Photography by Mark Paulda

Tubea hollow, usually cylindrical body of metal, glass, rubber, or other material, used especially for conveying

 or contains liquid or gases.

The 1863 the first tube opened in London, the District and circle line. Now it runs like an artery through length and breadth of London. The above Dictionary description describes it well ‘conveying or containing liquids or Gases‘ A smell and special dirt all of it own and a heating system all of it own. Artists have often taken influence in the underground Photographer George Rodger to the Sculpture work of Henry Moore with his cramped twisted torso of blitz sheltering families. I stumbled upon Mark Paulda’s work on Twitter. The collection of his work in London is totally breathtaking. Mark captures the grit and inner beauty of the growl of London. His underground work however for me stands on the merits of it own two feet. You can almost hear The Jam’s Down in a tube station at midnight playing in these images ” the dissident echos of far away voice boarding far away trains”.

The image I have picked to look before you check out his site was a difficult choice. However the relevance of the image was all the square tiles on the wall for me. They made me think about all the information that passes through and around us a we move. Card Transactions emails phone calls… The use of infinity in the images shows the endless struggle of life on the commute. A sense of isolation and tranquility are also captured in the image. It also captures the distortion that can find while sat on the train and thinking ‘oh i can change at this stop’ and 10 mins later you are still walking in the control of the underground…

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Many questions are asked in the search for why we photograph, Steven Shore ,Robert Adams, Diane Arbus to name a few. I want to look at Roland Barthes thought process in Camera Lucida “A specific Photograph, in effect, is never distinguished from its referent (from what it represents)”  The use of the prop (the clock) changes the  feel of the image and how we engage it. Barthes also talks about it being a mathematical impossibility to recreate an image twice.

Following on from yesterdays comments about the truth in an image. I was asked to photograph myself at the 11.11.11@11:11:11 as part of a project. In this image my clock is the cattle skull (please see http://wp.me/pNIdU-jY). This images gives us many answers to the why. All be it not the best image taken we see it was taken for the Binary date. So bar name (me) and location (Mochdre) we has a lot a justification for the capture of this image: date, time, moon cycle & weather A time capsule for that second never to be captured again

 

BBC News – Believing is seeing: What lies behind some iconic photos?.

Please watch the above

If, when, where, what…

All the many things we ask about an image. Is Photographer drive for social or economic change, a moment of chance, to show an experience.

I don’t disagree in the essence of the skull been moved as it was at the time trying to get a point across of the level of a national issue. However the Iwa Jima image is the other end of the scale. it was something that was spontaneous and missed. Then recreated in an act of power led by Generals. I think this is covered very well in the Clint Eastwood film Letters from Iwa Jima.

My work in the ‘Your last breath” captures a fictional moment to me the photographer but a recurring theme of streets of Britain with the ultimate price for acts of misadventure or Your last Breath…

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Reclaimed Land

The pinnacle…

follow the lights and you will find the gold.

A Severn wind rattles the soul,

rain like pins my face a cushion.

Edifice a vision, wooden windows a fact,

a collection of faces glued in community,

Now divided again by scheme funded foolery.

To escape is to renounce

only with strength from intrinsicality.

As thrust upon pages turn,

A dyeing side street lives

on the ensign of principality